Introduction to Physics Obj-1 HC Verma Solutions Vol-1 Ch-1

Introduction to Physics Obj-1 HC Verma Solutions Vol-1 Ch-1 Concept of Physics for Class-11. Solution of Objective -1 (MCQ-1) Questions of Ch-1 Introduction to Physics (Concept of Physics) .Visit official Website CISCE for detail information about ISC Board Class-11 Physics.

Introduction to Physics Obj-1 (MCQ-1) HC Verma Solutions Vol-1 Ch-1

Board ISC and other board
Publications Bharti Bhawan Publishers
Ch-1 Introduction to Physics
Class 11
Vol  1st
writer H C Verma
Book Name Concept of Physics
Topics Solution of Objective-1 (MCQ-1) Questions
Page-Number 9

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Ques for Short Ans

Objective-I

Objective-II


Introduction to Physics Obj-1 (MCQ-1) HC Verma Solutions Vol-1 Ch-1

Page-9

Question 1:

Which of the following sets cannot enter into the list of fundamental quantities in any system of units?
(a) length, mass and velocity,
(b) length, time and velocity,
(c) mass, time and velocity,
(d) length, time and mass.

Answer 1:

The option (b) length, time and velocity is correct

Explanation:

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We define length and time separately as it is not possible to define velocity without using these quantities. This means that one fundamental quantity depends on the other. So, these quantities cannot be listed as fundamental quantities in any system of units.

Question 2:

A physical quantity is measured and the result is expressed as nu where u is the unit used and n is the numerical value. If the result is expressed in various units then
(a)  n ∝ size of u(b)

(b) n ∝ u2(c)

(c) n ∝ u(d)

(d) n ∝ 1u.

Answer 2:

The option (d) n ∝ 1u. is correct

Explanation:

n ∝ 1/u The larger the unit used to express the physical quantity, the lesser will be the numerical value.

Example:
1 kg of copper can be expressed as 1000 g or 10000 mg of sugar. Here, g (gram) is the larger quantity as compared to mg (milligram), but the numerical value used with gram is lesser than the numerical value used with milligram.

Question 3:

Suppose a quantity x can be dimensionally represented in terms of M, L and T, that is, [x]=Ma Lb Tc. The quantity mass

(a) can always be dimensionally represented in terms of L, T and x,
(b) can never be dimensionally represented in terms of L, T and x,
(c) may be represented in terms of L, T and x if a = 0,
(d) may be represented in terms of L, T and x if a≠0.

Answer 3:

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The option (d) may be represented in terms of L, T and x if a≠0. is correct

Explanation:

If a = 0, then we cannot represent mass dimensionally in terms of L, T and x, otherwise it can be represented in terms of L, T and x.

Question 4:

A dimensionless quantity
(a) never has a unit,
(b) always has a unit,
(c) may have a unit,
(d) does not exist.

Answer 4:

The option (c) may have a unit is correct

Explanation:

Dimensionless quantities may have units.

Question 5:

A unitless quantity
(a) never has a non-zero dimension,
(b) always has a non-zero dimension,
(c) may have a non-zero dimension,
(d) does not exist.

Answer 5:

The option (a) never has a non-zero dimension,
 is correct

Explanation:

A unitless quantity never has a non-zero dimension.

Question 6:

HC Verma Solutions Introduction to Physics Ch-1 Obj-1 Q-6

The value of n is
(a) 0
(b) −1
(c) 1
(d) none of these.
You may use dimensional analysis to solve the problem.

Answer 6:

The option (a) 0 is correct

Explanation:

[ax] = [x2] ⇒ [a] = [x]    …(1)

Dimension of LHS = Dimension of RHS

HC Verma Solutions Introduction to Physics Ch-1 Obj-1 Ans-6

n=0

—: End of Introduction to Physics Obj-1 (MCQ-1) HC Verma Solutions Vol-I :–


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